brad brace

8/1/2014

Fiji’s Military Dictator Announces Democratic Elections

Filed under: corruption,fiji,government,human rights,military,tourism — admin @ 4:54 am

Fiji has been under the control of a military dictator since Rear Admiral Bainimarma seized power during a military coup in 2006. The island nation of Fiji has had a troubled political past with four military coups in the past decade. The international community has since put pressure on Fiji in order to push it toward democracy. Fiji is heavily reliant on tourism as a source of income and a stimulus for their economy. Both Australia and New Zealand introduced travel bans on Fiji in order to motivate political change in the country. The United Kingdom suspended Fiji’s Commonwealth Status, denying it the benefits of association with Great Britain.

In March Bainimarma announced that he would be stepping down as dictator and stating that he will run for re-election as a civilian and a member of Fiji’s ‘First Party’, which he now supports. Bainimarma claims that his coup in 2006 was necessary to ensure the restoration of democracy and to purge the rampant corruption that plagued the previous Fijian government. He says that he now looks to implement his plan for a better Fiji by holding open elections. In the wake of these statements the international community has reacted positively, praising Bainamarma for his decision. The government’s of Australia and New Zealand have lifted the travel bans on the island nation. The United Kingdom has also said they will reinstate commonwealth status if elections are successful.

However, there are still many issues with the upcoming elections, while Bainimarma announces they will be free and democratic there are some troubling events that have happened behind the scenes. Fiji has a history of restraining human rights and free speech; after recent constitutional change the military government heavily restricted these freedoms. There were incidents last year where protesters protesting the new constitution were arrested for failure to have a permit. There are many other stories of the regime arresting human rights defenders, journalists and trade union leaders. Critics in the press are skeptical of the upcoming elections and say that Bainimarma’s actions have no real teeth and will not effect change.

Despite the many instances of limiting the freedoms of the Fijian people, Bainimarma is extremely popular amongst the voters. He has implemented policies such as free education, free transportation for children and price controls on staple foods, all of which have made the military leader popular amongst the lower socioeconomic classes. In addition to these policies he has greatly improved the infrastructure of the islands making him popular amongst the rural population as well. It remains to be seen whether the elections will affect change in Fiji but Bainimarma has stated his intentions, his campaign is popular and the election in September will show whether he is sincere or not.

6/27/2014

Fiji Asks For Help to Fight the Affects of Climate Change in the Pacific

Filed under: climate change,fiji — admin @ 2:40 pm

The Government of the island nation of Fiji is accusing the international community, pointing mainly at Australia, of being selfish in regards to climate change policy. Fiji, like many other pacific nations is suffering greatly from the rising sea levels; these small island nations contribute very little to global carbon emissions but are suffering the consequences of the rest of the world’s high level of carbon output.

In a climate change summit hosted by Fiji, interim Prime Minister Bainimara said the global will to combat climate change is receding. He further pointed at Australia, saying that since the election of conservative Prime Minister Tony Abbot there has been a distinct change of attitude in Australia toward climate change policy. Abbot has been quoted as saying that he will not support any climate change policy in Australia that would negatively impact the Australian economy.

The interim Prime Minister of Fiji issued a harsh statement to the world, pointed at Australia and Prime Minister Abbot, saying that history will judge them harshly if they do nothing to effect policy change and allow the islands of the pacific to sink below the ocean. He further stated that leaders need to see the situation is dire for Fiji and other island nations and that leaders need to risk minor economic impact to save lives.

Indonesia was invited to the climate change summit in Fiji and pledged support to Fiji in combating climate change. Indonesia also has a strong incentive to mitigate the effects of climate change in the pacific. Indonesia has offered $20 million to Fiji to help fight the effects of climate change and has offered further support in the form of increased trade agreements with Fiji to boost trade revenue by a targeted $1 billion in the future.

The situation in Fiji is so serious that entire communities have had to be relocated since January 2014. The village of Vaunidogola had to be relocated to higher ground due to rising sea levels; the relocation affected 50 families whose ancestors had lived on that land for generations. The government of Fiji has also identified 600 villages across the Fiji islands that are at risk from the rising sea levels. The government predicts that over the next 10 years 40 settlements will have to be relocated due to the rise in sea levels, the pollution of the ground water and the destruction of agricultural land.

5/24/2014

Teci, Fiji

Filed under: culture,fiji,geography,global islands — admin @ 4:40 am

The villages of Teci (pronounced “Tethee”) and Dalomo, with a combined population of about 210, are situated on the eastern shore of Yasawa Island in the northwestern corner of the Fijian archipelago. The village of Teci is about a fifteen-minute walk from Dalomo, a ninety-minute walk from Bukama, and a two-and-a-half-hour walk from Nabukaru. To travel to the city of Lautoka, on the main island of Viti Levu, most villagers use a cargo ship that takes between one and two days and makes the rounds on a monthly schedule. (This ship sank in 2010 and has not been replaced.) Although it is possible to take a five-hour ferry from a point in the central part of the Yasawan archipelago, the transportation to the ferry and the ferry ride itself cost considerably more than traveling on the cargo ship. Villagers also sometimes use small motorboats to cross the Bligh Waters to Lautoka, though this sometimes results in disasters and disappearances. In the dry, deforested grasslands of this slender, twenty-two-kilometer-long island, economic life is based primarily on a combination of root-crop horticulture (yams and sweet manioc), littoral gathering (shellfish, mollusks), and fishing. Men bear the responsibility for clearing gardens (slashing and burning if necessary) and planting. Both men and women collect firewood, harvest agricultural products, and weed the gardens. Adults of both sexes and children also engage in littoral gathering, although women do more of this than men or children. Fishing is done principally by men, especially young men, and mainly involves free-dive spear-fishing. Older men, women, and boys use hook and line. Men also use nets to catch both fish and turtles. Women bear the primary responsibility for food preparation, cooking, laundry, and cleaning. Three main sociopolitical institutions govern village life: the traditional chiefly system, the government-instituted role of the Turaga ni koro, and the Christian churches. The most important of these institutions is the traditional system based on kinship, clans, and hereditary chiefs. Teci and Dalomo have five main mataqalis (pronounced “matangalees”), or clans, that together form a single yavusa. A yavusa is the largest territorial unit in the traditional Fijian system. Fijian villages often correspond, one to one, with a yavusa, with one chief per yavusa. However, Teci and Dalomo are part of the same yavusa, and there is a single chief for both villages. The chief lives in Teci, the older of the two villages. Leadership in each of the mataqalis is assigned primarily by age, gender, and descent, although skill and political acumen can also play a role. The head of the chiefly clan is officially installed as chief by one of the other mataqalis. The chief, together with the heads of the various mataqalis, makes decisions and deals with problems. At the time of our experiments, Teci’s previous chief had only recently died, and his heir (his older brother’s son) was still relatively young, so he had not yet been formally installed; nevertheless, he was still referred to as Tui Teci (Chief of Teci). At the time of our study, these villages were governed by a council of elders. Now integrated, and operating in parallel with the traditional system, is the democratically elected Turaga ni koro (Gentleman/Head of the Village), who acts as the representative of the Fijian national government. Both Teci and Dalomo have their own Turaga ni koro. The Turaga ni koro’s responsibilities are varied and include such tasks as dealing with visitors and keeping the village well-maintained. Though not an official part of their duties, the Dalomo Turaga ni koro operated the village radio-phone, and the family of Teci’s Turaga ni koro operated a village store that sold basic foodstuffs.1 In most matters we observed, the Turaga ni koro worked in concert with the council of elders and the chief, and all were seen as a unit. Layered across these institutions, and supported by Teci and Dalomo, are three different Christian religious sects—the Methodist, Evangelical Assemblies of God, and Seventh-Day Adventist Churches, in five separate congregations. These churches make numerous contributions to the villages, from organizing feasts to running youth groups. Fairness Without Punishment 227 Connections with the larger Fijian economy and municipal services are limited. There are no towns, and the only road on the island at the time of our visits was a dirt path that was used by an exclusive private resort near Bukama (the only resort on Yasawa Island).2 There are few opportunities for wage labor. At the time of our experiments, the resort employed three people from Teci and Dalomo. There are three primary schools on the island, including one in Teci. For education beyond the eighth grade, which many have not pursued, students must go to live either on the island of Naviti, in the center of the Yasawa group, or to Viti Levu. At the time of this research, there were three ways in which village families typically had access to market goods. First, several families maintained small supplies of flour, kava, yeast, sugar, salt, and other basic items, which they sold to their neighbors. Second, people traveled on the cargo ship—which came to Teci once a month during this period—to sell crabs, coconuts, mats, and other products in Lautoka and resupply on items like cooking oil and kerosene. Third, the private resort maintained a small shop where basic necessities could be purchased. Villagers did not make frequent use of this shop, owing to its high prices. All residents of Teci and Dalomo over about age six speak both Teci (the local dialect) and Standard Fijian (developed from the Bauan dialect). The two dialects are mutually unintelligible. A few people also speak some English. Although English is officially taught in schools, only a few of the older schoolchildren had learned more than a few phrases. More extensive details on life in these Yasawan villages can be found in the supplemental materials of Henrich and Henrich (2010).

Tutashinde Mbili Shaka! (Together we can win!)

3/28/2012

fiji notebook (little red, bamboo paper)

Filed under: fiji,global islands — admin @ 7:27 pm

Fiji notebook (little red, bamboo paper)

Filed under: fiji,General,global islands — admin @ 11:23 am

2/22/2012

FijiOne TV News = Ministry of …

Filed under: art — Tags: , , , , , , , — bbrace @ 11:58 am

FijiOne TV News = Ministry of Information

12/2/2011

In Fiji visitors are charged d…

Filed under: art — Tags: , , , , , , , — bbrace @ 10:10 am

In Fiji visitors are charged double – Fiji-you!

Bula from Naboro village #fiji

Filed under: art — Tags: , , , , , , , — bbrace @ 10:09 am

Bula from Naboro village #fiji

9/4/2008

Dengue fever outbreak in Fiji

Filed under: disease/health,fiji,global islands — admin @ 4:17 am

The medical authorities in Fiji confirmed a national dengue fever outbreak, the Fiji Times reported on Wednesday.

Sources close to the Health Ministry said divisional teams had been activated after a marked increase in cases reported at hospitals and health centers throughout the country.

It is understood that more than four cases of dengue per day have been reported at public and private health facilities over the past few weeks.

Interim Health Minister Jiko Luveni said as of Friday, 53 suspected cases of dengue had been reported throughout Fiji.

Luveni advised the general public to destroy all mosquito breeding places.

She said those who are suspected to be suffering from the disease should drink plenty of fluids.

But the Health Ministry has not made a public statement on the disease despite a meeting of senior doctors in the Western Division

Medical teams could soon begin massive spraying campaigns in an effort to kill the aedes aegyptii mosquito which carries the dengue virus.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease and has the potential to kill if patients are severely dehydrated or begin to lose blood.

Dengue fever symptoms include headaches, joint pains and bleeding from the mouth. The origins of the word dengue are not clear, but one theory is that it is derived from the Swahili phrase “Ka-dinga pepo”, which describes the disease as being caused by an evil spirit. The Swahili word “dinga” may possibly have its origin in the Spanish word “dengue” (fastidious or careful), describing the gait of a person suffering dengue fever or, alternatively, the Spanish word may derive from the Swahili. It may also be attributed to the phrase meaning “Break bone fever”, referencing the fact that pain in the bones is a common symptom.

8/13/2008

RWB condemns Fiji police tactics against journalists

Filed under: fiji,global islands,government,ideology,media — admin @ 9:16 am

The international journalists’ organisation, Reporters Without Borders, has condemned two cases of Fiji journalists being arrested and questioned for several hours by police in the past 10 days.

The latest was that of Fiji Times reporter Serafina Salaitoga, who was arrested at her home in the presence of her children, after writing a story that quoted a businessman Charan Jeath Singh as commenting about Suva politics.

Isaac Lal of the Daily Post was arrested and interrogated about an article linking a convict, Josefa Baleiloa, to an alleged plot to assassinate national leaders.

Mr Lal was picked up after the police spokeswoman complained about being quoted in the report.

Reporters Without Borders says these arrests will foster a climate of fear among journalists and harm news coverage.

5/6/2008

Fiji’s military threaten more expats and the media

Filed under: fiji,global islands,ideology,media — admin @ 7:02 am

More expatriates will be deported and Fiji’s military has threatened to close down the Pacific nation’s news media.

But military strongman Voreqe Bainimarama – who has installed himself as prime minister – says he did not want to close media down.

Bainimarama has confronted Fiji’s media bosses after last week deporting Fiji Times publisher Evan Hannah, three months after Fiji Sun publisher Russell Hunter was also kicked out.

Regional news agency Pacnews said Bainimarama told the meeting that Hannah will not be the last of the expatriates to be deported.

He told the executives he could not reveal why Hannah had been deported but said that others are likely to follow.

He said the news media were publishing “inciteful” articles and called for balance and fair reporting.

Pacnews said Bainimarama added the last thing he would want to do is close down the media and his government should not be likened to Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe.

The Fiji Times is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Ltd.

The Australian, owned by the same stable, reported this morning that the Fiji Times editor Netani Rika described how Bainimarama claimed that local journalists hate him.

Bainimarama claimed that shutting down the country’s media would be the worst-case scenario.

“He told us that he can shut the media down, but in his quotes, ‘I don’t want to do that’,” Rika told The Australian.

“He told us today that he did not want us to go down the path of Zimbabwe, but he was quite clear … while he did not want to close the media down, that would be an option if we did not take on board the concerns that he raised today.”

During the meeting, Bainimarama became agitated when the media representatives made it clear they would not “roll over and do what he wanted”, Rika said.

Bainimarama refused to explain how Hannah had breached his work permit, he said.

“The actual words he said was: ‘There’s no use discussing that matter. This person, Russell Hunter, and the other, Hannah whatever-his-name is, are not coming back’.”

Fiji's military threaten more expats and the media

Filed under: fiji,global islands,ideology,media — admin @ 7:02 am

More expatriates will be deported and Fiji’s military has threatened to close down the Pacific nation’s news media.

But military strongman Voreqe Bainimarama – who has installed himself as prime minister – says he did not want to close media down.

Bainimarama has confronted Fiji’s media bosses after last week deporting Fiji Times publisher Evan Hannah, three months after Fiji Sun publisher Russell Hunter was also kicked out.

Regional news agency Pacnews said Bainimarama told the meeting that Hannah will not be the last of the expatriates to be deported.

He told the executives he could not reveal why Hannah had been deported but said that others are likely to follow.

He said the news media were publishing “inciteful” articles and called for balance and fair reporting.

Pacnews said Bainimarama added the last thing he would want to do is close down the media and his government should not be likened to Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe.

The Fiji Times is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Ltd.

The Australian, owned by the same stable, reported this morning that the Fiji Times editor Netani Rika described how Bainimarama claimed that local journalists hate him.

Bainimarama claimed that shutting down the country’s media would be the worst-case scenario.

“He told us that he can shut the media down, but in his quotes, ‘I don’t want to do that’,” Rika told The Australian.

“He told us today that he did not want us to go down the path of Zimbabwe, but he was quite clear … while he did not want to close the media down, that would be an option if we did not take on board the concerns that he raised today.”

During the meeting, Bainimarama became agitated when the media representatives made it clear they would not “roll over and do what he wanted”, Rika said.

Bainimarama refused to explain how Hannah had breached his work permit, he said.

“The actual words he said was: ‘There’s no use discussing that matter. This person, Russell Hunter, and the other, Hannah whatever-his-name is, are not coming back’.”

3/26/2008

Sikhs Thrive In Fiji

Filed under: fiji,General,global islands — admin @ 5:01 am

Fiji has a dedicated and thriving Sikh community. From 1900- 1930 Sikhs from Punjab came to the Fiji Islands and became involved in farming, especially the sugarcane industry. The Punjabis have established themselves irreversibly, firmly and successfully in Fiji. The colorful and distinctive culture of the Punjabis have indeed contributed to the variety and attractiveness of Fiji.

There are five Gurdwaras in different parts of Fiji. They also have one Kindergarten, three Primary schools and one Khalsa College. There are about 800 members in the Sikh community in Lakoutta and about 1,500 in Fiji.

People of Indian descent have settled in Fiji for over 130 years and now constitute over 350,000 people. Most Punjabis arrived in Fiji during early 1900’s.

In Fiji however, the earliest Indians were brought over to the Fiji islands in by the British. They were brought to the Fiji Islands by the British Raj in India under 5 year term, but when they arrived in Fiji they were forced to work do menial labour for the Europeans.

7/31/2014

Kiribati and Climate Change: The Fight You Don’t Read About

Filed under: climate change,kiribati — admin @ 4:32 pm

If someone was to google “Kiribati,” search results will speak of the sad realities of this Pacific Island nation.

“Plagued by sea-level rise,” “Besieged by the rising tide of climate change,” and “Climate change destroys Pacific Island Nation” are the headlines you are most likely to stumble across.

Sadly, this island nation, rose to fame as steadily as the level of seawater has been rising to consume their islands.

Recent news articles about the people of Kiribati speak of them becoming climate refugees, having to relocate to another Pacific Island nation close by, Fiji, because of the continuous threat of climate change to its people.

But these headlines miss the fact that there’s still several decades before such a move caused by climate change might be necessary.

Constantly, the reality of the people of Kiribati have been brought to life with a common narrative — that they are mere victims of climate change. This is not a narrative only unique to Kiribati, but one that is slowly blanketing the rest of the region — from Tuvalu to the Marshall Islands. Yes, they are a vulnerable group of islands at the forefront of climate change, akin to the canary in the coal mine, but the way Kiribati is talked about by global media is like climate change porn. Its superficial and there’s no character development — Kiribati has become defined as the nation that is drowning.

Yet when I travelled there earlier this year, I saw a dramatically different side of Kiribati. My experience was defined by the people I met, the strength of their unique culture, and their warrior-like commitment to fight for their islands in the face of climate change. Armed with nothing more than a smile, a spring in their step, and the conviction of their forefathers — they are the caretakers of these lands and the vast ocean that surrounds them.

This video is another side of Kiribati that isn’t being told enough.

The place is beautiful, the people are joyful and their positivity is infectious. It was shot on the fly, during our 350 Kiribati Climate Warrior training. It shows just a snapshot of what it is about Kiribati that makes it worth fighting for.

The people I met in Kiribati refuse to remain silent as they continue to be talked of as climate change porn. Sure, the fossil fuel industry and the burning of coal may result in the map having less green dots and more blue in their region one day, but they are convinced that they must continue speaking their truth, and showing the humanity of what is at stake.

While they are aware of the realities of climate change, they are not defined by it.

They choose to be defined by the commitment to a better future, they choose to be defined by hope, they choose to be defined by resilience, they choose to change the narrative of the Pacific, shouting, we are not drowning, we are fighting!

The enemy of Kiribati is not just climate change, but it is the disempowering notion that its time to give up on the people, and the nation.

Right at this time, Kiribati needs all the allies we can muster around the world to fight its enemies. These allies are the people who will no longer just read the headlines, get depressed, and do nothing. Instead, they’re the people who realize that wherever they are in the world, there is something they can do to be part of the solution.

Are you one of them?

The work that we do at 350.org is to act as a focal point for those people all over the world to take action – before it really is too late.

6/27/2014

Vodafone ‘spying’ admission fuels election surveillance concerns

Filed under: consumer,fiji,human rights,ideology,institutions,media — admin @ 3:21 pm

Confirmation today there is cause for concern over phone and internet tapping by the regime leading up to the election.

Vodafone has admitted it has ‘secret wires that allow government agencies to listen to all conversations on its networks’, saying they are widely used in some of the 29 countries in which it operates ‘in Europe and beyond.’

Fiji is listed as one of those countries in a report by The Guardian newspaper, where Vodafone admits it allowed ‘state surveillance’ 760 times in Fiji in 2013.

Vodafone Fiji has denied as recently as April it even has the technology to allow phone and internet tapping.

Section 63 of the electoral decree prohibits people from communicating political messages by telephone, internet, email, social media or other electronic means 48 hours before polling opens and there is wide concern the regime will tap phones and monitor internet to prevent breaches.

Vodafone has previously denied it has the facilities to monitor calls and text messages, insisting it can only access phone records via police or court warrant.

It has also said there is no legislation in place which would allow for telecom operators to intercept text messages, phone calls or internet messages.

The Guardian newspaper report, however, says Vodafone has revealed ‘wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer.’

Concerns about phone and internet monitoring in FIji is not new. The subject has come up before on this blog, including revelations from former 3FIR commander, Roko Ului Mara, who says the regime started tapping phones in 2007.

Mara said both Connect and Vodafone do it, but Vodafone was the worst. Others have attested also that the regime uses experts from both India and China to spy on Fiji citizens, especially its critics. —–

World’s First Climate Change Refugee Denied Asylum in New Zealand

Filed under: climate change,kiribati,new zealand — admin @ 3:16 pm

A Man from the small Pacific islands of Kiribati applied as a “climate refugee” in New Zealand. Mr. Teitiota is the first to apply for such a refugee status. A New Zealand Judge dismissed Mr. Teitiota case and denied him and his family refugee status. This ruling was appealed the New Zealand Court of Appeals upheld the decision of the lower court. Mr. Teitiota and his family have been living illegally in New Zealand for the past seven years, after his initial visa exprired he applied for refugee status. Since Mr. Teitiota’s case and appeal have failed in the New Zealand courts, he and his family are to be deported back to Kiribati. Mr. Teitiota is married with three children, all three children were born in New Zealand; however, New Zealand does not recognize the offspring of illegal immigrants born in the country as citizens.

Kiribati

Abandoned Kiribati farm that has been destroyed by sea water

The New Zealand court held that under international law Mr. Teitiota does not qualify as a refugee. The UN Refugee Convention of 1951 states that a refugee must fear persecution if they returned home, the courts determined that this is a criterion that Mr. Teitiota does not meet. The court went on to say that if refugee status were granted, the floodgates would open for all medium-term environmental deprivation or damage refugees, which would create an influx of refugees. The court further said that Mr. Teitiota and his family would be able to resume their prior subsistence life with dignity in Kiribati.

The islands of Kiribati are quickly being swallowed by the Pacific Ocean. Projections show that the Island will cease to exist by the end of this century. However, the island will become uninhabitable even earlier due to the rise in the rise in the sea-level combined with a more severe storm cycle that will contaminate the water table and with it all the agricultural land. The main atoll, Tarawa is six square miles in total, crammed into this space are 50,000 islanders and that space is quickly shrinking.

The President of Kiribati is exploring options for a mass migration and the Kiribati government hoped that the case in New Zealand would give them that option. Other options the government is pursuing include the purchase of land in Fiji as a possible resettlement option. The government has also explored the option of building a man made island to resettle the population. In total there are over 100,000 people in Kiribati that will eventually be displaced by the rising sea level. With any option the the option of building a man made island to resettle the population. In total there are over 100,000 people in Kiribati that will eventually be displaced by the rising sea level. With any option the government pursues it will be difficult to relocate such as large group of people.

Strong M6.4 earthquake registered off the coast of Vanuatu

Filed under: climate change,disaster,vanuatu — admin @ 2:47 pm

Earthquake registered as M6.4 on the Richter scale struck off the coast of Vanuatu on June 19, 2014 at 10:17 UTC. USGS reports depth of 59.9 km (37.2 miles), EMSC is reporting same magnitude at depth of 60 km.

Epicenter was located 85 km (53 miles) WNW of Sola, and 219 km (136 miles) N of Luganville, Vanuatu.

There are about 6 295 people living within 100 km radius.

USGS issued green alert for for shaking-related fatalities and economic losses.

Overall, the population in this region resides in structures that are vulnerable to earthquake shaking, though some resistant structures exist. Recent earthquakes in this area have caused secondary hazards such as landslides that might have contributed to losses.

Seismotectonics of the Eastern Margin of the Australia Plate

The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most sesimically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand. Since 1900 there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke’s Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults’ strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

North of New Zealand, the Australia-Pacific boundary stretches east of Tonga and Fiji to 250 km south of Samoa. For 2,200 km the trench is approximately linear, and includes two segments where old (>120 Myr) Pacific oceanic lithosphere rapidly subducts westward (Kermadec and Tonga). At the northern end of the Tonga trench, the boundary curves sharply westward and changes along a 700 km-long segment from trench-normal subduction, to oblique subduction, to a left lateral transform-like structure.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 60 mm/yr at the southern Kermadec trench to 90 mm/yr at the northern Tonga trench; however, significant back arc extension (or equivalently, slab rollback) causes the consumption rate of subducting Pacific lithosphere to be much faster. The spreading rate in the Havre trough, west of the Kermadec trench, increases northward from 8 to 20 mm/yr. The southern tip of this spreading center is propagating into the North Island of New Zealand, rifting it apart. In the southern Lau Basin, west of the Tonga trench, the spreading rate increases northward from 60 to 90 mm/yr, and in the northern Lau Basin, multiple spreading centers result in an extension rate as high as 160 mm/yr. The overall subduction velocity of the Pacific plate is the vector sum of Australia-Pacific velocity and back arc spreading velocity: thus it increases northward along the Kermadec trench from 70 to 100 mm/yr, and along the Tonga trench from 150 to 240 mm/yr.

The Kermadec-Tonga subduction zone generates many large earthquakes on the interface between the descending Pacific and overriding Australia plates, within the two plates themselves and, less frequently, near the outer rise of the Pacific plate east of the trench. Since 1900, 40 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded, mostly north of 30?S. However, it is unclear whether any of the few historic M8+ events that have occurred close to the plate boundary were underthrusting events on the plate interface, or were intraplate earthquakes. On September 29, 2009, one of the largest normal fault (outer rise) earthquakes ever recorded (M8.1) occurred south of Samoa, 40 km east of the Tonga trench, generating a tsunami that killed at least 180 people.

Across the North Fiji Basin and to the west of the Vanuatu Islands, the Australia plate again subducts eastwards beneath the Pacific, at the North New Hebrides trench. At the southern end of this trench, east of the Loyalty Islands, the plate boundary curves east into an oceanic transform-like structure analogous to the one north of Tonga.

Australia-Pacific convergence rates increase northward from 80 to 90 mm/yr along the North New Hebrides trench, but the Australia plate consumption rate is increased by extension in the back arc and in the North Fiji Basin. Back arc spreading occurs at a rate of 50 mm/yr along most of the subduction zone, except near ~15?S, where the D’Entrecasteaux ridge intersects the trench and causes localized compression of 50 mm/yr in the back arc. Therefore, the Australia plate subduction velocity ranges from 120 mm/yr at the southern end of the North New Hebrides trench, to 40 mm/yr at the D’Entrecasteaux ridge-trench intersection, to 170 mm/yr at the northern end of the trench.

Large earthquakes are common along the North New Hebrides trench and have mechanisms associated with subduction tectonics, though occasional strike slip earthquakes occur near the subduction of the D’Entrecasteaux ridge. Within the subduction zone 34 M7.5+ earthquakes have been recorded since 1900. On October 7, 2009, a large interplate thrust fault earthquake (M7.6) in the northern North New Hebrides subduction zone was followed 15 minutes later by an even larger interplate event (M7.8) 60 km to the north. It is likely that the first event triggered the second of the so-called earthquake “doublet”. (USGS)

11/2/2013

Recent Films Studied

Filed under: culture,Film — admin @ 1:23 pm

• Holy Motors • The Lovers on the Bridge • The Widow of St. Pierre • Princesas • El Infierno • Bedevilled • Valentin • Which Way Home • Entre Nos • Innocent Voices • Y Tu Mamá También • Paris Was a Woman • The Beat Hotel • Salinger • Revolution: Season 1: • The Rundown • Year of the Fish • Little Moth • Owl and the Sparrow • Wonderful Town • The Overture • A Barefoot Dream • Balibo • The Shipping News • Reds • Days of Heaven • Mr. Bean: The Whole Bean: “Mr. Bean” • Lost in Translation • The Queen and I • Dear Murderer • The Naked City • The Conversation • Butterfly • Biutiful • Tetro • Essential Killing • The Mill & The Cross • Le Quattro Volte • Mafioso • Point Blank • Silmido • The Housemaid • No One Knows About Persian Cats • Hank: Five Years from the Brink • Journey of Hope • Turtles Can Fly • Times and Winds • Bliss • Or, My Treasure • Jaffa • The Wedding Song • Bedwin Hacker • Son of Man • Dreams of Dust • Beat the Drum • Lucky • Men at Work • The Deserted Station • Baran • A Time for Drunken Horses • Sounds of Sand • Mommo: The Bogeyman • Before Your Eyes • Dust of Life • Rampage • The Road • Dragon • Ichi • The Assailant • Captains of the Sand • Antonia • Only When I Dance • Behind the Sun • Forbidden to Forbid • The Samba Poet • Neighboring Sounds • A Bottle in the Gaza Sea • 21 Up South Africa: Mandela’s Childrenf• Holy Motors • The Lovers on the Bridge • The Widow of St. Pierre • Princesas • El Infierno • Bedevilled • Valentin • Which Way Home • Entre Nos • Innocent Voices • Y Tu Mamá También • Paris Was a Woman • The Beat Hotel • Salinger • Revolution: Season 1: • The Rundown • Year of the Fish • Little Moth • Owl and the Sparrow • Wonderful Town • The Overture • A Barefoot Dream • Balibo • The Shipping News • Reds • Days of Heaven • Mr. Bean: The Whole Bean: “Mr. Bean” • Lost in Translation • The Queen and I • Dear Murderer • The Naked City • The Conversation • Butterfly • Biutiful • Tetro • Essential Killing • The Mill & The Cross • Le Quattro Volte • Mafioso • Point Blank • Silmido • The Housemaid • No One Knows About Persian Cats • Hank: Five Years from the Brink • Journey of Hope • Turtles Can Fly • Times and Winds • Bliss • Or, My Treasure • Jaffa • The Wedding Song • Bedwin Hacker • Son of Man • Dreams of Dust • Beat the Drum • Lucky • Men at Work • The Deserted Station • Baran • A Time for Drunken Horses • Sounds of Sand • Mommo: The Bogeyman • Before Your Eyes • Dust of Life • Rampage • The Road • Dragon • Ichi • The Assailant • Captains of the Sand • Antonia • Only When I Dance • Behind the Sun • Forbidden to Forbid • The Samba Poet • Neighboring Sounds • A Bottle in the Gaza Sea • 21 Up South Africa: Mandela’s Children • Miss Bala • Anatomy of a Murder • Local Color • Lady Terminator • V for Vendetta • For Ever Mozart • The Cow • Unknown Pleasures • The Bad and the Beautiful • Balseros • Imitation of Life • Network • The Postman Always Rings Twice • Palace of the Winds • Red • Lincoln • Wilde • A Clockwork Orange • Still Life • In the Realms of the Unreal • BaadAsssss Cinema • Sing Faster: The Stagehands’ Ring Cycle • Pure Brazil: Bossa in Rio • The Rules of the Game • From Here to Eternity • Down by Law • The Conformist • Zabriskie Point • Le Amiche • The Passenger • Red Desert • Blow-Up • Summer of Sam • Lawrence of Arabia • Of Gods and Men • Where the Green Ants Dream • Tomorrow • The Bad Sleep Well • 10,000 Black Men Named George • The Blue Lagoon • Mutiny on the Bounty • Toka Toka: Forbidden Fiji • Reel Paradise • 24 City • Slumdog Millionaire • Raise the Red Lantern

12/12/2012

Filed under: disaster,fiji,weather — admin @ 6:01 am

11/8/2012

Borneo Mail

Filed under: borneo,culture,disease/health,global islands — admin @ 4:59 am

Hi Brad Brace,

Many thanks for the email.

We do have a room available from Nov 1st to Dec 11th. I have group booking from Dec 12th to 26th (yet to be confirmed). But free from Dec 26th till end of Jan.

Our room rate is RM110 per night for single occupation incl food and beverages as mentioned on our website www.pondok-keladi.com. Since you’re staying for more than a month, the rate for you is RM80 per day incl food and beverages as cleaning your room. If you stay less than a month, the original rate remains. I cant give you any further discount as you’re coming during the high season.

Please reconfirm your booking by giving us arrival details. I may need a deposit of 300 canadian dollars (non refundable) from you to be deposited into my Malaysian bank account once everything is confirmed.

As we only have six rooms, our policy is first-come-first-served basis.

Looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Regards Rosidi

Will do…

On Sep 2, 2012 9:31 PM, “{ brad brace }” wrote:

thanks Rosidi: I’d need the room for the entire period (Nov-Jan), so please let me know if it becomes available

/:b

On Sunday, September 2, 2012, at 04:13 AM, rosidi daud wrote:

Hi Brad Brace,

Many thanks for the email.

We do have a room available from Nov 1st to Dec 11th. I have group booking from Dec 12th to 26th (yet to be confirmed). But free from Dec 26th till end of Jan.

Our room rate is RM110 per night for single occupation incl food and beverages as mentioned on our website www.pondok-keladi.com. Since you’re staying for more than a month, the rate for you is RM80 per day incl food and beverages as cleaning your room. If you stay less than a month, the original rate remains. I cant give you any further discount as you’re coming during the high season.

Please reconfirm your booking by giving us arrival details. I may need a deposit of 300 canadian dollars (non refundable) from you to be deposited into my Malaysian bank account once everything is confirmed.

As we only have six rooms, our policy is first-come-first-served basis.

Looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Regards Rosidi

On Sun, Sep 2, 2012 at 4:31 AM, { brad brace } wrote:

Hello, I’m a Canadian artist/designer (I make small books about small islands); looking for long term, secure, budget accommodation for 3+ months (November-January)… I like the sound of your place: hope you can help!

/:brad brace

You can try rainbow lodge…they do long stay and have plenty of rooms. Google for their contact number

On Sep 3, 2012 12:38 AM, “{ brad brace }” wrote:

thanks, I’d appreciate hearing of any other quiet, secure, long-term budget accommodation on the island   /:b

From: booking@rainbowlangkawi.com Date: Sun Sep 2, 2012 7:45:21 PM US/Pacific To: { brad brace } Subject: Re: long stay

Quoting { brad brace } :

hi, thank you for your mail.we have a house with one bedroom,a/c fully furnished with small kitchen a a living room.bathroom attached with hot shower.it’s rm2200 per month.please reply if you are interested.

regards,

hi, thank you for your mail.we have the accomodation around that figure.rm900 per month with basic accomodation,(double bed) with hot water (shower) and basic furniture.please reply if you are interested.

regards,

thanks! (rm = malaysian ringgit?) that’s too expensive for me: I only need something small/basic (but secure, quiet) for around $300US/month

/:b

On Sunday, September 2, 2012, at 07:45 PM, booking@rainbowlangkawi.com wrote:

Quoting { brad brace } :

hi, thank you for your mail.we have a house with one bedroom,a/c fully furnished with small kitchen a a living room.bathroom attached with hot shower.it’s rm2200 per month.please reply if you are interested.

regards,

Will try…

Then again you’re coming in the busiest months. Most of them make more money in these months for short stay guests.

Cheers

On Sep 5, 2012 1:32 AM, “{ brad brace }” wrote:

thanks very much Rosidi for this contact… I’d also be interested in a rural village homestay if you happen to know anyone interested… I could pay around $300US/month

/:b

hi, thank you for your mail.i will get back to u on that.on the meantime u can check our website.it have some photo.we will still did not uploads some of our picture.like i said,it’s a basic accomodation with fan, clean double bed.hot shower and basic furniture.porch.

thank you.

From: awieahmad@yahoo.com Date: Thu Sep 6, 2012 9:06:34 AM US/Pacific To: “{ brad brace }” Subject: Re: long stay Reply-To: awieahmad@yahoo.com

Hai brad…I can’t promise now…cause our room very limited…but we do have a small room maybe went ur arrive here u can c first…. Have a nice day…

Hi,

We do not do monthly rental. Our cheapest rate is RM60/n. If you are looking for monthly rental, maybe you can try at this place, Amzar Motel +6049552354.

Rgds, Afidah

Hi

Thanks for your email but I am sorry Gecko does not accept any bookings, just walk-in guests.  I do not do a rate for long term accommodation, its only a nightly rate which ranges from rm15 for dorm, rm35 fan room with sharing bathroom and rm50 for attached bathroom.

Thanks

Rebecca

Dear Brad Brace

I am Khairul

Please tell me more about your self and what kind of accommodation/package do you need. I will help you.

Thanks & best regards

Khairul Hakimin bin Haji Sahariman +60192243805

From: Sahariman Hamdan To: Khairulitm Hakimin Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2012 7:18 AM Subject: Fwd: Pulau Tuba homestay

Dato’ Haji Sahariman bin Haji Hamdan

Begin forwarded message:

From: Sahariman Hamdan Date: 13 September 2012 7:18:28 PG GMT+08:00 To: brad brace Subject: Re: Pulau Tuba homestay

Welcome to homestay malaysia, My members will get in touch with you asap.

Please tell me more about yourself and your visit n also what is the budget cost for you per day , for accomodation, meals, and etc.

Tqvm

Dato’ Haji Sahariman bin Haji Hamdan

Hi 

Good morning to you. 

For your information. Our minimun package USD30/day. Include accompdation & meal (bfast, lunch & dinner. 

Thanks

Khairul Hakimin bin Dato’ Haji Sahariman +6 019 2243 805

Sent from my iPhone

hi, we are a guesthouse running with small capacity of workers.it’s been busy lately and i don’t have a time to take a room picture yet but if you look at the room photo we have on our website,it’s almost the same.i’m truly sorry.

regards,

hello, still like the sound of this arrangement (3+ months: Nov-Jan): any other info/photos would be good… thanks /:b

I can discuss with our Homestay members to give 25% discout if 3 months. But the price we are talking is exclude activity. But dont worry we will help you to arrange the activity for you. The rest is your free time enjoing your stay. 

Thanks

Khairul Hakimin bin Dato’ Haji Sahariman +6 019 2243 805

Sent from my iPhone

On 17/09/2012, at 8:06 PTG, { brad brace } wrote:

thanks Khairul, at USD30/day that would be USD2700 (!) for three months — I was hoping for a discount considering how long I am staying (?)

/:brad brace

Reply-To: Stephanie Gunsalam Attachments: There are 8 attachments

Warmest Greetings from Maliau Basin Conservation Area (Sabah Lost World..)!

Dear M,

Attached, Please find the estimated cost for 5Days 4nights Package.

Please Bring Your own Sleeping Bag.

Dear Mr.Brad,

Please take note of the term and conditions that need to be complied before entering Maliau Basin Conservation Area. The terms & condition are as follows:

(1)  Each visitor who wishes to do any activities in MBCA are require strictly to have an insurance policy which cover helicopter evacuation.

(2) You are require to bring your own sleeping bag, First Aid Kit and useful tool for trekking such as flashlight, Leech socks, Rucksack etc.

(3) Maliau Basin is adopting A ZERO WASTE MANAGEMENT POLICY, in which, for every non-organic waste produced must be carried out of MBCA.

(4) Please note that for any activities especially trekking within the MBCA, the management will only provide ForestRanger as to caretakers to the visitor during your stay at MBCA, and will not provide tourguide or Naturalist.For visit arranged through travel agent, the tour agencies are required to provide a Tour Guide or a naturalist.

Please send us your full details  Such as Full Name, Copy of Insurance Policy, Passport No., Nationality and any other relevant information to our office.

For confirmation of your booking, please sign on the estimated cost as per attached as an agreement and email or fax it back to us the soonest possible.

For your further information, the payment method is by cashonly.

Thank you for your interest in staying with us at Maliau Basin Conservation Area. Please do not hesitate to contact us should you need further assistance.

NOTE : PLEASE RECONFIRM YOU TOUR TO MALIAU BASIN 1WEEK BEFORE THE DATE AS YOU REQUEST.

Warm regards Stephanie Gunsalam Reservation (Maliau Basin Office Tawau) Maliau Basin Conservation Area 2nd Floor, UMNO Building P.O.Box 60793 91017, Tawau, Sabah Malaysia

From: “Reservations Gayana” Date: Thu Sep 20, 2012 6:16:13 PM US/Pacific To: “‘brad brace'” Subject: RE: long stay

Dear Mr. Brad,

Warmest greetings from Gayana Eco Resort. Thank you for expressing your interest in our island resort for your upcoming travel; We would be appreciate if you can advise us on the exact date of your travel; So that we can check the room availability for you, as well as provide the best accommodation options.

We would be appreciate if you can advise us with more of your trip; Is there any special occasions such as birthday, anniversary, or any special dietary requirement, etc; That we need to pay attention to; So that we can be alert of these details during your stay with us in the resort.

Should there is further inquiries, please do not hesitate to revert to us via reply We’re looking forward to hear from you soon Thank you

Rgds Alvin

Dear brad,

 Your long stay at our resort or you are doing the marketing for us. Please advise.

 Siar Beach

From:brad brace [mailto:bb] Sent: Friday, 21 September 2012 6:45 a.m. To: dlpw@streamyx.com Subject: long stay

 hello, I’m a Canadian artist/designer  (I make small books about small islands), looking for budget/basic long-term accommodation (Nov-Jan). hope you can help   /:brad brace

Dear Brad Brace

Warmest Greetings From Travel Centre

Thank you for your interest to Gaya Island Resort.

We are happy to offer a very special rate for you at RM400++ (RM464nett) per room per night inclusive of daily breakfast for 2 Adults in our Gaya Villa

Our resort offers a full board Meal Plan which enables you to enjoy a 3 course lunch and dinner at any of the restaurants on the island without restriction. All meals can be selected from any of the resorts A La Carte menus. The Meal Plan is also inclusive of a Sunset Cruise onboard our teakwood Chinese Junk. If you are celebrating, or simply plan to enjoy a memorable evening, why not upgrade to a private dinner for only an additional RM100 per person.

The resort Meal Plan costs RM280++ per person per day for adults if purchase at the resort. For advanced purchase before you travel, the price is RM280 nett, saving you RM45 per day. Children enjoy a 50% discount from the adult rate. Water, tea & coffee are included. Other drinks will be chargeable to your personal account.

Hope to hear from you and please do advice us on how to proceed from here

Regards Adi

Dear Brad,

Thank you for the email below, we are happy to offer you as per below details.

RM 4’200.00 nett per month (the best rate).

Including: Laundry Service, Breakfast, Sunday Roast Lunch for 1 or 2 person (Every sunday only) and wifi service.

Hope this will help you and if you need more details, please do not hesitate to send us an email.

Looking forward to hear from you soon.

Regards,

Irene

Hi Brad,

I can only tell you by end of oct if my room is free frm dec 12th to 26th. I,m actually reserving the rooms for my friends from abroad…

As for the homestay, a coupke of ownets I spoke to prefer shprt let as they make more money in dec and jan as high season.

The best bet is still rainbow lodge or you van wait till end of oct if you,re still keen on staying with us.

I,m in jakarta now. Back in langkawi on sunday.

Take care Rosidi

From: “SIPADAN.COM” Date: Sun Sep 30, 2012 10:16:48 PM US/Pacific To: bb Subject: Re: Sipadan Inquiry Attachments: There is 1 attachment

Dear brad ,

Thank you for your email and time ,

If you are staying for 16 night 17 days , Firs you need to buy the package first for 3 night 4 days package for RM 650 pp ( 7 x boat Snorkeling trip around Mabul / kapalai

Extra night : RM 70 pp / night + full board of meals . x 13 night = RM 910 per person

Total RM 1560 pp

Extra snorkeling trip is RM 50 pp / boat trip around Mabul / kapalai But you can decide when you are here .

Package includes as follow :

* 16  night stay at budget accommodation base on twin shared basis , shared bathroom / fan * 7 x boat snorkeling trip around Mabul / kapalai * Full boar of meals * Full set of snorkeling gear equipment * Return boat transfer from Semporna to Mabul island

Our diving / Snorkeling schedule :

8:00 am first dive 10:30 am second dive 1:30 pm third dive 3:30 pm sunset dive

 boat transfer :         Semporna to Mabul : 8 am         mabul to Semporna : 4 pm         out of schedule : additonal RM 50 per person per way

This package is excluded :

    Jetty fee : RM 10 per person     Airport transfer that transfer you from Semporna to Tawau airport and forth     night accommodation In Semporna (dragon Inn)

If you are unable to catch our boat schedule, it is suggested to stay a night in Semporna before leaving to Mabul the next day. We may assist you to reserve it. Kindly pay directly to hotel lobby upon arrival :

    Dragon Inn – private room : RM 77 per room     Dragon Inn – Dormitory : RM 22 per person

Airport transfer : (if needed, kindly fill the airport transfer box in the booking form)

   RM 80 per car per way at day time     RM 100 per car per way after 6 pm

Shall you proceed to a reservation , please fill the form attached

Thanks, 

Aini

Hi Brad Brace,

 Thanks for your interest on Summer Friends.

 Our accommodation rate is at MYR90 (approx. USD30) per pax per night inclusive of 3 meals daily. However, we only accept week term for accommodation only. It means you have to rebook on a weekly basis and we reserve the right to reject the next renewal with at least 2-day notice.

 Your kind understanding is highly appreciated as we will have to prioritize our rooms for package bookings.

 Many thanks and have a great week ahead!

 Regards,

Janice

SummerFriends Tour and Dive Sdn. Bhd.

Email: crew@summerfriendshomestay.com / janice@summerfriendz.com

Website: www.summerfriendshomestay.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SFHomestay

Dear Brad ,

Thank you for your email and time ,

If you are staying for longer 3 months +++

RM 40 pp / night + full board of meals in dorm bed RM 100 pp return boat transfer

OR

RM 60 pp / night + full board of meals ( base on twin shared basis / shared bathroom / fan RM 100 pp return boat transfer

Trust the above are in order ,

Thanks, Aini

On 10/1/2012 10:11 PM, { brad brace } wrote:

Hello, I’m a Canadian artist/designer (I make small books about small islands); looking for long term, secure, budget accommodation for 3+ months (November-January)… I like the sound of your place: hope you can help! Not all that interested in diving… snorkeling perhaps…

/:brad brace

Hi

Thanks for mailing us.

Are you planning to stay in the dorm room for 3 month? You plan to snorkel and do not dive at all?

our dorm room price is rm70 per person. if you stay with us for 3 month, i can offer you rm50 per person per night, it is 4 bed room with attached bathroom and fan. there is a boat transfer charged for semporna-mabul-semporna of rm100 and this included already your snorkel at mabul with boat at 9.30am and 2pm everyday.

for the mask and snorkel, i suggest you to buy your own and you can use it in the long term instead of renting them :)

Thank you and hear from you soon!

Jamilah

Uncle Chang’s Sipadan Mabul Dive Lodge  P.O. Box 37, 91307 Semporna, Sabah Causeway Rd. S.O.T.C. (+6) 017-8950002 (+6) 089781 002 / 089 782002

Brad, 

How’s it going ?

Great to hear that you would like to head this way, I think that it best I put you in touch with WWF as they are organising a few things on Banggi and the adjacent island Malaianggin and I am sure that they could point you in the right direction, please see the copied in address above.

If you need a break from the island and would like to head to my place you can check out : www.tampatdoaman.com

With best wishes , 

Howard

C/O Petit Surat 115, Kudat, Sabah, East Malaysia

Telephone : +60 (0)13 880 8395

109 Evesham road, Stratford-Upon-Avon Warwickshire England CV37 9BE Tel : (01789) 415910

— On Sun, 7/10/12, { brad brace } wrote:

From: { brad brace } Subject: BANGGI ISLAND To: Stanton_howard@yahoo.co.uk Date: Sunday, 7 October, 2012, 18:33

Hello, I’m a Canadian artist/designer (I make small books about small islands); looking for long term, secure, budget accommodation for 3+ months (November-January)… on Banggi Island, Hope you can help!   /:brad

Brad, 

Sorry to say that I am not too sure, Sophia will know more and be able to advise, she may also point your in the direction of Malianggin island, this would probably be a good thing.

With best wishes, 

Howard

C/O Petit Surat 115, Kudat, Sabah, East Malaysia

Telephone : +60 (0)13 880 8395

109 Evesham road, Stratford-Upon-Avon Warwickshire England CV37 9BE Tel : (01789) 415910

— On Mon, 8/10/12, { brad brace } wrote:

From: { brad brace } Subject: Re: BANGGI ISLAND To: “howard stanton” Cc: “Sofia Johari” Date: Monday, 8 October, 2012, 1:55

thanks very much Howard!

I read that there are only two guesthouses on Banggi — the cheaper one owned by the government — do you think I might get a discount for a long stay (?) and would I have trouble finding accommodation during the holidays? are there other options?

I’ll definitely keep your place in Kudat in mind.

/:b

Brad, 

Great and all good, I reckon you would be best to stay in KK for that night and then head up our way in the morning , I have cc’d in Karen from Step in Lodge as I would suggest that you could stay there. I also attach our generic E mail we send out to all enquiries so that you can see what you are letting yourself in for , have a look at our web site too : www.tampatdoaman.com

With best wishes and safe journey, 

Howard

A very good morning to you.

 Great to hear that you might be heading this way, yes we do have availability for the dates you have said and we would love to see you up here. The area is fantastically beautiful, very undiscovered and a great place to get out and explore. Hire a bike and some snorkel gear to get the best out of the place or head off into the jungle with one of our guides.

 The rates for your long house / “semi permanent tents” are RM 30 per person per night.

 We can pick you up from Kudat (30km away)  for RM 15 per person each way, if the transfer is needed before 2pm, after 2pm the transfer rate rises to RM 30 per person.

 The best way to get here is to jump in a shared taxi from a place called Bandaran Berjaya in Kota Kinabalu, the best time is in the morning between 8am and 10am, Cost: RM 25 each, give us a call / SMS when you are leaving Kota Kinabalu (013 880 8395) so that we can guage when you will be arriving in Kudat, about a three hour trip. Our usual meeting place is the Ria hotel, they have a cafe underneath with free WiFi .

 Hoping that all is good with you, please confirm the dates so that we can book you in.

With best wishes,

Howard and the Tampat Do Aman crew

Hi, very sorry on the late reply, can you inform what kind help you need. Are you planning to come here?

regards Richard Sulip Kaiduan Homestay +60128200338 On 23 Sep 2012 00:19, “brad brace” wrote: > > hello, I’m a Canadian artist/designer  (I make small books about small islands), looking for budget/basic long-term accommodation (Nov-Jan). hope you can help   /:brad brace

From: Sofia Johari Date: Mon Oct 8, 2012 9:14:29 PM US/Pacific To: “{ brad brace }” Cc: howard stanton Subject: Re: BANGGI ISLAND

Dear Brad & Howard,

Here is my reply to your enquries (the same as my reply to Angela – our communication officer in Kota Kinabalu):

There are 2 options:

1) Stay in Karakit, Banggi Island (can be reached directly by ferry from Kudat) for RM500 per month in a home (a house on stilts on water with 2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen, toilet) – Nobody living in the house owned by community member of Maliangin island origin. However, will have to share the house with WWF staffs (2 or 3 people) sometimes when we have activity on the island. Breakfast provided and can cook in the house (cooking utensils and gas for cooking provided). Water source – government pipe water supply. Electricity – 24 hours

2) Maliangin homestay (located 15-30 minutes boat ride from Karakit, Banggi island – depending the type of boat) – stay with a family (3 houses to choose from), the family has household of 5 – 7 people in the house all the time, they can cook for you, usually they will charge RM30 per day with meals 3 times a day, that will total up to RM900 a month. However you might have to provide them with raw materials to cook. Water source – untreated spring water/well water. Have proper toilet and shower facility. Electricity – none

I would recommend try staying both in Karakit (longer term) and Maliangin (short term) as Karakit will have all the basic facilities you will need for a long term stay and your research (eg: restaurants,market,boat transfer, ferry, clinic, saundry shops and etc) and in Maliangin for a short period of time (as this place have none of the facilities mentioned above but have proper toilet and shower- harder to access other areas).

You can negotiate with people in Karakit to go to the other islands around Banggi island (eg: Patanunan, Balak Balak, Balambangan, Tigabu etc.). WWF staffs in Kudat will be able to help with the negatiations if needed.

Sofia

Hi Brad,

Yes, your passport must be valid for more than 6 months from the date of entry. Refer to the link below for more info:

http://www.imi.gov.my/index.php/en/main-services/syarat-kemasukan-ke- malaysia

Thanks and kind regards,

Linda Stephen E-BORNEO.COM TOURS & TRAVEL SDN BHD (862652-M ; KPL/LN 6169)

Lot No. 7, 2nd Floor, Block C Lintas Jaya Uptownship 88200 Penampang Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Malaysia Tel: +6-088-722606 Fax: +6-088-727606 URL: http://www.e-borneo.com/

On Mon, Oct 8, 2012 at 12:44 PM, { brad brace } wrote:

hello, I’m a Canadian tourist whose passport expires in May 2013 — I plan to visit this Nov-Jan — does my passport need to be valid 6 months from the time of arrival or departure? thanks   /:b

Dear Brad

Thank you for your email and interest to stay in the proposed Tun Mustapha Park.

For accommodation you can stay at:

1) Karakit Town, Banggi Island (can be reached directly by ferry from Kudat) for RM500 per month in a home (a house on stilts on water with 2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen, toilet) with bedding and linen provided, except you need to bring a towel. There is no one living in the house, owned by a community member of Maliangin Island. However, you may have to share the house with WWF staffs (2 or 3 people) sometimes when we conduct activities on Karakit. Breakfast will be provided but you can cook yourself (cooking utensils and gas for cooking provided). Water source – government piped water.

2) Maliangin Island Homestay (located 15-30 minutes boat ride from Banggi island – depending on the type of boat you manage to hire) – stay with a family (3 houses to choose from), the family has household of 5 – 7 people in the house at all times and can cook for you, charging RM30 per day with 3 meals per day, that will total up to RM900 a month. However you might have to provide them with raw materials to cook. Water source – untreated spring water/well water. There is a basic squat toilet and shower facility.

Our Community Liaison Officer, Sofia Johari, recommends that you try to stay at both Karakit (longer term) and Maliangin (short term) as Karakit will have all the basic facilities you will need for a long term stay and for research (e.g., eating stalls, market, boat transfer, ferry, clinic, sundries shops and etc.) and Maliangin to experience life on an idyllic island.

You can also negotiate with people in Karakit to go to the other islands nearby as well; e.g., Patanunan, Balak Balak, Balambangan, Tigabu. Sofia can help negotiate if you don’t speak Bahasa Malaysia, and she can also make any booking or connect you to the relevant service providers. WWF is helping to promote the area for ecotourism and other sustainable livelihoods alternate to fishing.

For Maliangin check out: www.facebook.com/malianginisland Watch videos from the recently concluded Tun Mustapha Park Expedition: http://www.youtube.com/user/TMPE2012

Sincerely, — Angela Lim Communications Manager Sulu-Sulawesi Marine Ecoregion (SSME) Programme WWF-Malaysia, Suite 1-6-W11, 6th Fl, CPS Tower No.1, Jln Centre Point 88000 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia Tel: +60 88 262 420, Fax: +60 88 242 531 Email: alim@wwf.org.my

Dear Mr Brad Brace,

Greetings from “The Land below the Wind”!

Thank you for your enquiry, our profound apologies for getting back late.

We are happy to offer you a room upstairs Boungain Villa at RM900 per month (USD300 equivalent roughly).  This is a fairly large room, fan-cooled and with a common bathroom (with hot shower, washbasin and toilet) right outside.  However, BV is nearest to the road so you may not find this room suitable if you like to sleep during the day or a light sleeper.

Suggest when in Sabah, come over and check it out before making any commitment.

Once again sorry for the delay, if you have found something else somewhere, i will understand.

Please let us know if you have any other queries.

Hope to hear from you.

Best wishes…James (088 757999 t 019 8106161 hp James Leopard Ong fb)

“SIT BACK & RELAX”

James Ong (Operations Manager) SEASIDE TRAVELLERS INN Tel:  +60 88 750555, 750313, 752067 & 751794 Alternative Tel:  +60 88 757999 Fax:  +60 88 750479 E-mail:  stinn89@gmail.com  Alternative E-mail:  james@seasidetravellersinn.com.my Website:  www.seasidetravellersinn.com.my

“Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail” thanks Rini — how about a discount for such a long stay? I’m also interested in all the tours!

/:brad brace

Brad, 

All good and we look forward to seeing you, 

With best wishes, 

Howard

C/O Petit Surat 115, Kudat, Sabah, East Malaysia

Telephone : +60 (0)13 880 8395

109 Evesham road, Stratford-Upon-Avon Warwickshire England CV37 9BE Tel : (01789) 415910

— On Sun, 14/10/12, { brad brace } wrote:

From: { brad brace } Subject: Re: BANGGI ISLAND To: “howard stanton” Date: Sunday, 14 October, 2012, 13:50

[ hi Howard, just in case you missed the earlier email: ]

Howard: my flight gets in a little after midnight (so, Nov 6); Asiana OZ0757 from Korea

so, once I pick up a SIM, exchange some dollars, etc., I’ll be heading to your place on the 6th — please reserve an inexpensive room for me!

looking forward to my visit!

/:brad brace

Dear Brad,

Warm greeting from Step~In Lodge, Malaysian Borneo! 

Thank you for your booking and your booking is confirmed for1 non air conditioned private room at RM70nett single/double occupancy per room per night with breakfast from6/11/12 for 2 night(s) and check out on 8/11/12.Last minute of extending of stay is subject to the availabilityof the day and on first come first serve.

We’ve received the cc email from Howard as well and thank you for selecting us.

For your information, we do assist guests to plan their travel itinerary and book tour packages as well, so please feel free to contact us for any assistance or tour information. Meantime, look forward toreceiving your confirmation soonest possible. Booking shall be releasedautomatically 3 days after our reply if no confirmation received or last minute confirmation is subject to availability.Thank you and look forward to receive your confirmation soonest possible.

Regards, Karen

Brad, 

Not too sure, probably best you get them before you leave or in KK.

With best wishes, 

Howard

C/O Petit Surat 115, Kudat, Sabah, East Malaysia

Telephone : +60 (0)13 880 8395

109 Evesham road, Stratford-Upon-Avon Warwickshire England CV37 9BE Tel : (01789) 415910

— On Tue, 16/10/12, { brad brace } wrote:

From: { brad brace } Subject: Re: BANGGI ISLAND To: “Sofia Johari” Cc: “howard stanton” Date: Tuesday, 16 October, 2012, 13:27

Sofia/Howard: is there a medical vaccination clinic in Kudat/Banggi for Japanese Encephalitis? I’ll be needing these shots.

/:brad

Hi Brad there is a clinic in Banggi island, however it is better to get your vaccination in the government hospital/clinic in Kudat.

SJ

On Tue, Oct 16, 2012 at 8:27 PM, { brad brace } wrote: Sofia/Howard: is there a medical vaccination clinic in Kudat/Banggi for Japanese Encephalitis? I’ll be needing these shots.

/:brad

Thanks for your confirmation and the taxi is RM30 per way from airport to city during normal operating hours, another 50% midnight surcharge is levied from 12:00 midnight to 6am.

Not all clinics are having JE vaccination and usually they don’t carry stock, a 2 days notice is required to order the vaccine, therefore you may need to get it done early or pre order if you required the vaccination.

Regards, Karen

From: { brad brace } Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:21 PM To: Reservation @ Step-in Lodge Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

thanks Karen! sounds good

* what should the taxi fare be from the airport (at night)?

* is there a medical vaccination clinic for Japanese Encephalitis in KK (or in Kudat?)

/:brad brace

Welcome and see you soon!

From: { brad brace } Sent: Thursday, October 18, 2012 9:01 PM To: Reservation @ Step-in Lodge Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

ok thanks Karen ! good info — see you soon :)

/:brad

On Tuesday, October 16, 2012, at 11:57 PM, Reservation @ Step-in Lodge wrote:

Thanks for your confirmation and the taxi is RM30 per way from airport to city during normal operating hours, another 50% midnight surcharge is levied from 12:00 midnight to 6am.

Not all clinics are having JE vaccination and usually they don’t carry stock, a 2 days notice is required to order the vaccine, therefore you may need to get it done early or pre order if you required the vaccination.

Regards, Karen

Hi Brad, I’ll get back to you on the appointment for JE vaccination! Regards, Karen

From: { brad brace } Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 8:13 PM To: Reservation @ Step-in Lodge Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

Karen, could you please pre-order the JEV for me and an appointment for Nov 7 in KK? I’d really appreciate your assistance on this matter.

/:brad

Hi Brad,

Yes sure, let me know when you are here in Kudat, will pick you up from somewhere or you can come straight to our WWF-Malaysia office in Kudat.

Here’s my number again +6013-8638323

Regards Sofia

On Tue, Oct 23, 2012 at 9:06 PM, { brad brace } wrote: Hi Sofia, I’ll be checking-out of the StepinLodge (in KK) and heading up to Kudat on the morning of Nov 8th. Would that be a good time/place to meet?

/:brad brace

Hi Brad,

The JEV course consists of 2 jabs, the 2nd jab will be 1-2 weeks apart from the 1st jab and the cost is RM80 per jab, total of RM160 for the whole course, the 3rd jab can be done a year later.  The nearest clinic is Clinic Malaysia which is 5 minutes walk from here and right now KK has total of 4 sets which is going to expire in December 6, 2012, new stock may not be the same price.  According to Dr Henry, in order to secure the stock, the clinic requires the full payment to order the vaccination and you may need to provide credit card to secure the stock if you would like to do it here.  Please let me know your decision, otherwise you may do it in your home town if that’s more convenience to you since it’s still enough time to have the vaccination.

Cheers, Karen

From: { brad brace } Sent: Saturday, October 27, 2012 6:47 PM To: Reservation @ Step-in Lodge Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

thanks Karen: any time on Nov 7 will be fine I’ll be in Sabah for 3+ months so it’s worth getting the shots

/:b

Yes, you can get the 1st jab on Nov 7, that is why the Dr needs to pre order the vacine so you can have the jab on 7th!  I’ll forward your email to Dr Henry, perhaps he could answer your questions.

Cheers, Karen

—– Original Message —–

From: { brad brace } To: Reservation @ Step-in Lodge Sent: Monday, October 29, 2012 5:35 PM Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

thanks Karen — so, if I paid for the vaccinations on Nov 7, could I get the first jab then? and stay at your place (maybe just in the dorm), for one week waiting for the second jab? and how long before I’m protected? is JE very common in rural Sabah? do you know the name of the vaccine? (here you have to wait 28 days between jabs)

/:brad

Dear Mr Brad The only vaccine available in Sabah is JE Vaccine manufactured by Green Cross and diastributed by Propharm. You could get more information regarding this vaccine from http://www.mims.com.my/ or by looking in the Korean Green Cross webpage.

The product leaflet advises having an interval of 1 to 2 weeks between vaccinations and a booster after one year. JE is not common in Sabah. Therefore, the vaccine is not commonly available.

The current stock of vaccines with the distributor expires on 6 December, 2012. Therefore, if  we administer the first dose on the 7th November, we could administer the second dose between 14 – 21 November.

We require a deposit of the full amount of RM80.00 per dose before we transfer the vaccine from the distributor to our clinic. At present there are 4 doses available with the distributor in Kota Kinabalu.

I would advise that the payment be made in advance as it might take 2 to 3 working days to transfer the vaccine from the distributor to our clinic. There are a few public holidays in November.

Please liase with Karen with regards to the payment. Please do not hesitate to contact us for further information.

Thank you & Regards Dr Henry

From: Operations To: hrponniah@yahoo.com Sent: Monday, October 29, 2012 7:51 PM Subject: Fw: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

Hi Dr Henry,

This is Karen from Step~In Lodge, Sinsuran.

Here are the questions asked by Brad, who is going for the JE jab, perhaps you could provide the answers to his questions please.

Regards, Karen

Hi Brad

It’s not been a concern the past few years, but if you can, might as well get it. However, you should prevent from getting bit by mosquitoes. Use insect repellent or wear long sleeve tops/pants if possible given the heat. Malaria and Dengue are more the worry.

Look us up in our office at Centre Point shoppping centre, if you have time: WWF-Malaysia, Suite 1-6-W11, 6th Fl, CPS Tower No.1, Jln Centre Point 88000 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia Tel: +60 88 262 420

Safe travels, Angela

On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 5:30 AM, { brad brace } wrote:

Hi Angela, nearly ready to go!

Arranging some Japanese Encephalitis shots (JEV) in KK but wonder how common this disease is in Sabah/Banggi/Maliangin…?

/:brad

Hi Brad, You just need to stay 8 nites to get the 2 jabs one in KK, not necessary for the whole month.  Yes we do give 10% off for a minimum of 7 consecutive nites stay and 30% off for 30 consecutive nites stay.  Cheers, Karen

From: { brad brace } Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 12:17 AM To: Operations Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

thanks Karen — it’s sounding like I’ll need to stay in KK a while in order to finish these shots: could I get a special rate for staying with you for rest of the month of November?

/:brad

Hi Brad, Mosquitos is not a big problem in the Banggi house, in fact I dont remember being bitten by one inside or just outside the house. I also have never seen rats inside the house so far, maybe because it’s over the water. Monkeys, yes… so try not to leave your things on the verandah or outside the house whenever you leave the house.

However, it would be handy to have mosquito repellent cream with you all the time.

It is a simple house, sorry to dissapoint you, but with closed simple bathroom.

As for dos and donts, since majority of the population living in the coastal area are Muslim, it is not a norm to walk around the beach in bikinis or topless for women, for guys they can almost get away with anything, except for walking around naked.

Few issues on Banggi island: 1) Karakit has waste management issue, so you will see garbage along the populated area. My advice dont swim too close to the housing area. WWF-Malaysia and Banggi Youth Club (BYC) members are working on raising awareness about waste management through Green Lifestyle Campaign. BYC is doing weekly environmental education activities with the community especially with school children. 2) There are 3 groups of community in Banggi/islands around it, those with legal Malaysian status (with IC – Identity Cards), without ICs (IMM13 pass holder – war/political refugees from Phillipines), and theres who does not have any documentation at all who has been living there forever or from the Phillipines. Having one or not is a sensitive issue.

Majority of the population speaks Malay, Bajao Ubian, Sulug language. Other tribes/languages are Kagayan, Binadan, Bajao Sama, Dusun Bonggi. Not many can speak English.

By the way, from 5th-10th November there will be a handicraft training organized by Malaysian Handicraft Department and WWF-Malaysia in Karakit, Banggi Island. Handicraft makers from all over Banggi will be there to participate in the training.

SJ

On Wed, Oct 31, 2012 at 3:37 AM, { brad brace } wrote: Sofia, would there be few mosquitos at the Banggi house, as it’s over the water?

somehow I’m picturing a simple house over the water where I could bathe in the hot sun (which I love,) and work on my paintings, photos and sound recordings… but not cowering inside for fear of various mosquito flavivirus… I’d take precautions when going into town for meals/supplies; (and I’m imagining some great sound recordings in the Karakit badminton court.)

so _please tell me now how realistic my expectations may be

these island projects nearly always naturally generate collaborations with local concerns… and I’m always delighted to forge long friendships (I pick up languages quickly)

/:b

u r most welcome,

To my standard the house is secure :) We usually leave our things such as laptops and cameras inside, the daughter of Maliangin Island Head of Village is taking care of the house. Yes of course will be happy to introduce you to the neighbours

SJ

On Wed, Oct 31, 2012 at 10:19 AM, { brad brace } wrote: thanks Sofia!

is the house secure/locked? — can I leave my things inside without worry (I have a lot of electronic/photo gear and painting materials)? will you be able to introduce me to my neighbours? love to see the handicrafts!

/:brad

yes, there is locks on the doors Celcom coverage is full on Banggi island (particularly in Karakit Township), unless during black outs electricity in Karakit township and a few other major village is 24 hours there’s no farmed pigs on the island as most of them are Muslim, however there’s wild boars in the forest

SJ

On Wed, Oct 31, 2012 at 11:38 AM, { brad brace } wrote: questions questions questions :) so, no locks on the doors? Celcom coverage on Banggi? will I be able to boil water for drinking and/or buy bottled-water? any electricity? are there pigs, rice fields (JE) on the island?

/:b

Hi Brad,

I believe Dr Henry has already informed you regarding JE information in Sabah, should you have further enquiries, kindly contact Dr Henry Directly. Thank you.

Cheers, Karen

Hi Brad

Banggi is the largest island in Malaysia, not most populated but with humans and secondary bushes (not quite forest). The house is at the water edge of Karakit town, close to communities so lots of mosquitoes breeding. Bring insect repellent for day and night use. You can choose not to, if you don’t find yourself being a target :-) Maliangin is much smaller island with small forest, so also mosquitoes and sand flies (bites itch like crazy so bring some antihistamine cream too if you have sensitive skin).

Best, Angela

Ooops sorry, I think DDT has been banned in Malaysia too. But the Health Department do some kind of fogging in areas where there’s reports on Malaria or dengue cases etc. and I am not familiar with Rachel Carson’s work.

in the remote areas of Banggi, there’s Dusun Bonggi community, some of them still live in very traditional way, they use to build houses on trees (20m above ground), have very unique culture and most of them are pagan. Most of the WWF staffs working in this area are from Banggi island, so we have no problem communicating with the local tribes here, but most of the community here speaks Malay except for the elderly ones. Im not from Kudat/Banggi area by the way, Im from Kota Kinabalu, so I dont speak the local tribes in Kudat/Banggi language :D

Interesting website you have, would like to witness you working on your project in Banggi if you dont mind :) Oh yes, there’s so many photos of the WWF Kudat-Banggi team online….. we even have our own blog http://mamengstories.blogspot.com/

SJ

On Wednesday, October 31, 2012, { brad brace } wrote:

cool… but DDT? (I’m guessing you might know Rachel Carson’s work: Silent Spring, etc) in the USA, DDT has been long-banned (nearly killed-off the national bird: bald eagle)

so, who lives in the very remote villages? are these maybe centuries-old tribes?? are you able to communicate? indigenous culture is of particular interest to me — wish there were more health services…

here’s a brief sketch of my Global Islands Project I think I’ve seen some of your photos online (?) ;)

/:b

On Wednesday, October 31, 2012, at 12:42 AM, Sofia Johari wrote:

there’s wet-rice field and hill paddy field inland Banggi; in Karakit the water is treated tap water, other villages inland Banggi and smaller islands around Banggi island depends on either spring/gravity-fed system, well, rainwater. You can buy bottled water in Karakit and in other small villages inland Banggi, however if you want to drink water from other source, even the tap water, you have to boil it, just to be safe. Health department will go to villages on Banggi island and other populated smaller islands around Banggi from time to time to spray the areas with DDT.

Yes, I have visited most of the villages on Banggi island by road on 4WD and around the coastal areas by speed boat as these areas cant be access by road. I think there’s about 40 registered villages on Banggi island with more than 20,000 people living on it. Some village are so remote you have to cross a crocodile infested mangrove swamp to reach there… this kind of village I have not visited :)

SJ

Hi Brad

Mosquito control would be under the govt agencies and health depts. They do it whenever someone reports being hit by malaria/dengue – very much case by case. But it is not effective enough. Cholera outbreaks happen too, so would suggest that you make sure all the water you consume has been distilled and boiled. At the very least, boiled. Drinking straight out of the tap is a big no-no throughout SE Asia.

We have a blog site on the work done in Kudat, not been actively updated but will give you a nice overview of what we’ve been engaging with the communities and govt agencies. http://mamengstories.blogspot.com/

Best, Angela

On Wed, Oct 31, 2012 at 4:36 PM, { brad brace } wrote:

Angela, in Canada, spraying the larger urban centres, and the cold winter months, help to control mosquito and black-fly populations — there is no malaria, dengue or JE (… just a few rare recent instances of “West Nile Disease” which is maybe related to JE.)  Have there been efforts to control mosquitos in Sabah? Aerial spraying? Those lovely beaches/islands up North would perhaps attract more development in the absense of vector borne disease… or perhaps it’s the jungle’s unwitting defense mechanism ;) Have you visited many villages on Banggi? Are there indigenous tribes on Maliangin?

I’ve been following WWF online: huge political challenges but you do good work! (I’m still remotely involved in eco-tourism issues in Bangladesh — all stemming from a Global Islands Project there some years ago…

/:b

On Tuesday, October 30, 2012, at 08:05 PM, Angela Lim wrote:

Hi Brad

Banggi is the largest island in Malaysia, not most populated but with humans and secondary bushes (not quite forest). The house is at the water edge of Karakit town, close to communities so lots of mosquitoes breeding. Bring insect repellent for day and night use. You can choose not to, if you don’t find yourself being a target :-) Maliangin is much smaller island with small forest, so also mosquitoes and sand flies (bites itch like crazy so bring some antihistamine cream too if you have sensitive skin).

Best, Angela

On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 6:04 PM, { brad brace } wrote:

thanks Angela — wouldn’t there be few mosquitos at the Banggi house, as it’s over the water?

somehow I’m picturing a simple house over the water where I could bathe in the hot sun (which I love,) and work on my paintings, photos and sound recordings… but not cowering inside for fear of various mosquito flavivirus… I’d take precautions when going into town for meals/supplies; (and I’m imagining some great sound recordings in the Karakit badminton court.)

so _please tell me now how realistic my expectations may be

these island projects nearly always naturally generate collaborations with local concerns… and I’m always delighted to forge long friendships (I pick up languages quickly)

/:b

On Monday, October 29, 2012, at 05:13 PM, Angela Lim wrote:

Hi Brad

It’s not been a concern the past few years, but if you can, might as well get it. However, you should prevent from getting bit by mosquitoes. Use insect repellent or wear long sleeve tops/pants if possible given the heat. Malaria and Dengue are more the worry.

Look us up in our office at Centre Point shoppping centre, if you have time: WWF-Malaysia, Suite 1-6-W11, 6th Fl, CPS Tower No.1, Jln Centre Point 88000 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia Tel: +60 88 262 420

Safe travels, Angela

On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 5:30 AM, { brad brace } wrote:

Hi Angela, nearly ready to go!

Arranging some Japanese Encephalitis shots (JEV) in KK but wonder how common this disease is in Sabah/Banggi/Maliangin…?

/:brad

I have never worried about all these deseases whe Im travelling abroad or even in forested areas, maybe I should be aware of this kind of thing in the future. I hope you have fully recovered and get your vaccination soon.

The Dusun Bonggi people are very interesting indeed, they are quite shy, you can only find them in Banggi and another island nearby, Balambangan island. Maybe you want to live with them for a few days to get to know them better. Me and my team members stayed with one family for one night, they were reluctant to accept us at first but we somehow managed to persuade them in the end. I dont know about their culture and sea snakes, but finding more about this would be very interesting. Not many people know about this tribe and their culture. They have a unique dance called Tabadak, a dance traditionally danced to celebrate a person who had just recovered from a life threatening illness (I think… maybe you can confirm this for me in the future). Dusun Bonggi build houses on trees mainly to avoid pirates and so they can easily attack the pirates from the comfort of their tree house :D, Ive tried finding the remaining tree house but I have not been successful so far, the villagers said tree houses still exist somewhere in the interior area of Banggi.

I also believe there are so many great stories to be uncovered on the island if you can connect with the community in Banggi and the other island nearby.

I didnt realized that so many town names begin with ‘K’ until you mentioned it, I will make it my short term goal to find out….

Theres 2 major types of destructive fishing method used around this area; fish bombing and sodium cyanide. Most of the materials can be found locally and in the nearby Philippines islands like Mangsi island which is only about half hour boat ride from Banggi, the international border between Malaysia and Phillipines in this area is quite porous. Villagers from Banggi travel back and forth to island such as Mangsi to get groceries and goods to be sold in their tuck shop because it is a lot cheaper there. It is againts the law to use fish bomb and sodium cyanide to fish. The villagers here are quite a chemist, since its not that easy to get sodium cyanide supply anymore the villagers use chlorine and mix it with something else to stun fish instead. The long term consequences of eating sodium cyanide caught fish is unknown, but people dont get sick from consuming fish caught by this method (sodium cyanide breaks into some other substance in seawater). However sodium cyanide impacted coral reefs badly, that is why we have a anti-fish bombing and use of sodium cyanide campaign here.

How they use sodium cyanide; they mix sodium cyanide with sea water and pour it into a plastic bottle, then they dive and look for crevices where fish such as grouper hide and squirt the substance into this crevices and wait for the fish to get stunned and float out from its hiding. Then they will catch the fish using net. Usually these fishermen will hold their breath for a few minutes underwater or they use air coming from a long hose attached to a compressor on their boat so they can stay longer. They can dive as deep as 60m with this compressor on their boat. Maybe you want to try when you’re visiting, but not for squirting sodium cyanide to catch fish….

SJ

On Thu, Nov 1, 2012 at 2:22 AM, { brad brace } wrote: ok/sure/thanks Sofia; earlier this year I came back from remote Fijian islands (I do this all on a very ‘shoestring’ budget with no regular job) — no malaria, dengue, JE — but somehow I contracted some weird typhus condition (I was transferred between planes in a wheelchair: big infected lesion on my ankle made it impossible to do anything but painfully hobble)… which scared the daylights out of me, as I’ve never been sick in my life…. so of course now I hate/fear mosquitos… (along with the predatory US hospitals which charged me a fortune, which I couldn’t pay, for essentially nothing)… so I might postpone this trip at the last moment if I can’t arrange the JEV in KK… let you know… it’s seems to be a rare disease in Sabah lately but I’d be especially vulnerable with little immunity… same probably goes for Dengue and maybe Malaria (although I have doxy tabs)

the Dunsun Bonggi sound very interesting! is their culture associated with the sea-snakes? I’ve read accounts about huge masses of them swimming together in the sea… but I suppose they can readily climb trees… so did the Dunsun build their houses in trees to avoid tribal conflict?

I remember innocently asking an Okinowan islander how long his family had lived there… without a moment’s hesitation or qualification, he simply stated “forever.” And that may very well be exactly correct and natural and a dismissed association these days… though even I could sometimes feel the ancestors’ presence in sacred spots… there are great stories… (!)

why do so many towns’ names begin with the letter K? :) read all of your blog :) thanks! so, where do “fishermen” find cyanide? do they just dump it in the water? aren’t the fish then deadly to eat?

/:b

Dear Mr Brace According to the Medical Department in Sabah, there are no local cases of Dengue or Jap Encephalitis in the islands you plan to stay in. The cases of Dengue usually orginate from elsewhere (not endemic) However, Malaria is endemic in Bangi. You might want to go on Malarial Prophylaxis whilst staying there. We can arrange for Malarone, which is one of the safest types of Malarial prophylaxis to be available before you leave for the islands. The dosage is 1 tablet daily. Start one to two days prior to entering the endemic area and continuing for a week after leaving the area. However, it is costly and is currently priced at RM230.00 per box of 12 tablets. Regards Dr Henry

From: { brad brace } To: henry ponniah Sent: Monday, October 29, 2012 11:58 PM Subject: Re: JE Vaccination-Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

thank-you Dr Henry!

I’ll be staying on rural Banggi and Maliangin Islands in Northern Sabah for three months — do you think JE poses a significant threat? Is Malaria/Dengue a concern?

/:brad brace

Okay, no problem to cancel the booking.

From: { brad brace } Sent: Friday, November 02, 2012 7:48 PM To: Reservation @ Step-in Lodge Subject: Re: Step~in Lodge Online Reservation Form

Karen, I’ve decided to postpone my visit, so please cancel my reservation — I very much appreciate all your help and wish you well.

/:brad brace

you are most welcome Brad. You will learn Malay fast, its easy to learn :)

I love working with the community here, most WWF staffs especially those working in the field are on project/contract basis, so the job is pretty much depending on the fund that we are getting from donors.

I dont know much about the Phillipines pirate, some of the pirates we have here are local pirates, but dont worry its quite safe here. I believe some pirates live among the local community here… I was also told that there’s undercover police living among the community to keep an eye on this kind of things.

SJ

On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 7:45 PM, { brad brace } wrote: thanks Sofia — I really appreciate your responses! (sorry I don’t know much Malay yet)

do you think you’ll continue to work for the WWF? (seems like a great organization)

can you tell me more about the Philippine pirates?

the Medical Dept in Sabah says that malaria is endemic on Banggi, with no local cases of dengue or JE there or Maliangin

/:b

Hi Brad

No idea on chemicals used. Banggi being larger would have been inhabitated longer, so Maliangin would be more recent in comparison. There probably was more interaction with the Philippines before Malaysia was formed, but there are cross-site visits between distant relatives currently.

Best, Angela

On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 7:57 PM, { brad brace } wrote:

thanks Angela; do you know what chemicals are used in the mosquito spray? has Maliangin been more recently inhabited than Banggi? is there much interaction with the Philippines?

/:brad

Hi Brad, Sama sama (ur welcome)

Unfortunately I dont have photo of the Bonggi house… sorry, will need to find one first :)

Let me know when you arrive in Kudat. Me and the WWF-team are in Banggi now.

SJ

On Sun, Nov 4, 2012 at 8:43 AM, { brad brace } wrote: terima kasih banyak-banyak!

do you happen to have any pictures of the Banggi house?

/:b

On Saturday, November 3, 2012, at 07:11 AM, Sofia Johari wrote:

you are most welcome Brad. You will learn Malay fast, its easy to learn :)

I love working with the community here, most WWF staffs especially those working in the field are on project/contract basis, so the job is pretty much depending on the fund that we are getting from donors.

I dont know much about the Phillipines pirate, some of the pirates we have here are local pirates, but dont worry its quite safe here. I believe some pirates live among the local community here… I was also told that there’s undercover police living among the community to keep an eye on this kind of things.

SJ

On Fri, Nov 2, 2012 at 7:45 PM, { brad brace } wrote:

thanks Sofia — I really appreciate your responses! (sorry I don’t know much Malay yet)

do you think you’ll continue to work for the WWF? (seems like a great organization)

can you tell me more about the Philippine pirates?

the Medical Dept in Sabah says that malaria is endemic on Banggi, with no local cases of dengue or JE there or Maliangin

/:b

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